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Showing posts with the label awesome-wm

Centos 7 pulseaudio

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Centos 7 doesn't come with an option for `awesome-wm` installation.  Therefore, the only way to make use of this light-weight tiling manager one has to enable Fedora 19 repo or build the package from source.  For the Fedora 19 repo approach, see:

https://gist.github.com/ILMostro/1909a50e1858d0ee7e10

To use without GDM, GNOME's display manager, and without gnome services, one has to be aware of certain shortcomings that the gnome-services provide by default.  One such shortcoming is the lack of built-in Sound and Volume management.  Never fret, though, as there is a solution; namely, the PulseAudio-focused tools pavucontrol and pavumeter.  These packages are available from the "nux-desktop" repository available at at http://li.nux.ro/repos.html .
nux-desktop My unofficial, as-is, not for profit RPM repositories for EL (RHEL, CentOS, ScientificLinux etc): These repos may or may not be up to date or behave the way you expect them to; use them at your OWN RISK!

Some of…

Awesome Window Manager

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The Awesome Window Manager, awesome-wm, is a tiling window manager for Linux PCs that can be used as a standalone X-session or as part of a Desktop Environment, e.g. Gnome, KDE, etc. It's a great lightweight alternative to a full-fledged Desktop Environment, and it's one of the few GUI sessions available that handles dynamic desktop-layouts on multiple monitors/displays quite well. The image below, for example, shows a PC with a built-in display and six separate desktop layouts, along with an external display with its own set of six desktop layouts.

awesome-wm Sound/Audio Fix

As a Window Manager, awesome-wm's lightweight composition results in a more-responsive user experience as compared to a full-fledged Desktop Environment like Gnome, for example. However, depending on your needs, lightweight might also be described as stripped down; your expectations of what simply "works" (or should work) right out the gate in a graphical desktop session, without any user input, may be misguided, as I found mine to be today after attempting to watch a YouTube video with no apparent sound.

Puzzled by the strange effect, I clicked on another, different, random video, restarted my browser, cleared the cache, tested the audio output with VLC media player to ascertain the persistence of the problem. It seemed inconceivable to me that I hadn't noticed this behavior before, especially, because I had been using awesome-wm for years it seemed! Alas, 'twas so afterall.

Here's how I managed to fix the problem with Audio playback on my Fedora2…