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Showing posts with the label ddwrt

Troubleshoot USB-Printer Connected to Router

I had complained about a flood of error messages being continuously printed out every time a print job was sent to the USB-printer attached to my Asus AC56U router with merlin-378.55_beta1. Yesterday, after I had reverted to the official asuswrt firmware to troubleshoot the printer-sharing feature, I used nmap on my laptop to see the open common ports on the clients on my network:


Code: # nmap -T4 -F 192.168.1.0-2 The router displayed two ports related to the printer service:


Code: 192.168.1.1 Host is up (0.0065s latency). Not shown: 94 closed ports PORT STATE SERVICE 53/tcp open domain 80/tcp open http 139/tcp open netbios-ssn 445/tcp open microsoft-ds 515/tcp open printer 9100/tcp open jetdirect Anyway, long story short, I had been using the socket://192.168.1.1:9100 path to the printer; changing the configuration on my laptop (CUPS-server) to point to lpd://192.168.1.1:515/AUTO finally resulted in SUCCESS!

Configure rsyslog Server on Fedora

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It can be very beneficial for system administrators and network administrators, especially, to log system messages from other machines on the network to a centralized hub. Fedora 20 uses rsyslog as the default syslogd service; this allows administrators to configure remote logging. I'll be detailing the necessary configuration steps of rsyslog in Fedora 20 to allow logging messages from a DD-WRT router. This will entail Edit /etc/rsyslog.confSet up firewall rule to allow incoming connection to serverConfigure DD-WRT router to send syslogd messages to our server
rsyslog server Our server will be the Fedora 20 machine. There are two configuration files in the /etc/ directory that are of interest to us: /etc/rsyslog.conf /etc/sysconfig/rsyslog However, the latter file is not useful anymore as it states: # Options for rsyslogd # Syslogd options are deprecated since rsyslog v3. # If you want to use them, switch to compatibility mode 2 by "-c 2" # See rsyslogd(8) for mor…

Troubleshoot JavaScript Functionality--Firefox Browser and DD-WRT Network Router

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HTML5 is here! On October 28th, 2014 the HTML Working Grouppublished HTML5 as W3C Recommendation. This specification defines the fifth major revision of the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), the format used to build Web pages and applications, and the cornerstone of the Open Web Platform.

When the talk of HTML5 comes up generally it's understood that, for the most part, CSS3 and JavaScript are an intricate part of the "whole". Extended features such as responsive design among other things are nothing without all three languages. JavaScript in particular uproots the "operating system" and unshackles users from the confinement of locally-run software with seemingly boundless potential.

Well, if that wasn't a loaded statement then you still have faith that I know what I'm talking about. Regardless, this post is mainly meant to help troubleshoot the possible causes of a half-assed web-experience followed by constant, nagging banners suggesting that you…